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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> this isn't about terrorism. these are regular law enforcement investigations, and this is, this is, investigating people's communications. these are, who they talked to. who they e-mailed. who they engage in online conversations with, their friends, family, colleagues and loved once. >> reporter: here are some facts gathered by the aclu from justice department document. between 2009 and 2011 the number of orders for surveillance went up 60%. e-mails and network data, while smaller in number, increased by 361%. this type of information used to be gathered from devices attached right to the telephone but now, it can easily be retrieved by the phone company internally. aclu says it is done without a judge considering merits of the case. but the department of justice fired back saying in a statement, in every instance cited here the federal judge authorized law enforcement activity as criminals increasingly use new and sophisticated technologies use of orders used by a judge and strictly authorized by congress is essential for law enforcement to carry out its duty and to protect the pu
in the nation that has done this for kids and for teenagers. governor jerry brown signed this ban in into law over this past weekend and tweeted about it. let me read one of his tweets. this bill bans nonscientific, quote, therapies that have driven young people to depression and suicide. joining me is david pickup, a reparative therapist and spokesman for the national association of research and therapy of homosexuality, he is getting miked up. also with me right now is cnn's senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. so, elizabeth, as we await david, just begin with what we know about this so-called reparative therapy. >> the american psychological association had a task force that took a long look at this. and here's what they came up with. they said there is no good studies showing it works or doesn't work. so no good studies showing this works. they say some people have been harmed by it, depression, other problems. and this is a quote, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of psychological interventions to change sexual orientation. >> okay. >> plainly spoken. >> hold tha
're the first to tell you why. tonight, we have the likely reason and we have it from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens. that was two and a half weeks ago. two and a half weeks that have seen the administration first describe this as a spontaneous outburst even though our reporting revealed that officials knew within 24 hours that it was not. only much later did they back away from that assessment. today, the director of national intelligence, james clapper, put out a statement explaining that early evidence supported that theory so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says that throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our sources specify a time frame for the dni's change of view. again, our sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a terror attack. our reporting also reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is go
reason and from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontaneous outburst, even though reporting shows that officials knew within 24 hours it was not. today the director of national intelligence, james clapper, explained early evidence supported that theory, so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our source have a time frame. law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours this was a terror attack. reporting reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothing, the fbi has hit a bump in the road. a senior law enforcement official, telling fran townsend, the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection in other words, but that request was not granted. fran is a former white
sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a terror attack. our reporting also reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothly, the fbi has hit a bump in the road to the crime scene and tonight, we've got reporting that could explain why that is. a senior law enforcement official telling fran townsend the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection, in other words, but that request was not granted. fran's a former white house homeland security advisor. she served in the george w. bush administration, currently she sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with her employer, mcandrews and forbes. also joining us, former fbi assistant director, tom fuentes, who has extensive experience investigating attacks on americans overseas, and former cia officer, bob baer. so fran, so the fbi sought military protection to go into benghazi. why didn't they get it? >> well, the answer to that question, i think, is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you w
was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our source have a time frame. law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours this was a terror attack. reporting reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothing, the fbi has hit a bump in the road. a senior law enforcement official, telling fran townsend, the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection in other words, but that request was not granted. fran is a former white house homeland security adviser, serbed in the george w. bush administration. sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with mcandrews & forbes. and former fbi assistant director tom pointes who has extensive experience in investigating attacks overseas. so there was military protection to go into benghazi, why didn't they get it? >> the answer to the question is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you want to set up a security perimeter, you may look to the host country. if the host country is unable or unwilling to prode it, we don't know what the ans
care law was enacted, 3.1 million people under thege of 26 are now covered by their parents' plans. and preventive care is covered 100% by insurance companies. seniors in particular have benefited on prescription drugs. >> seniors who fall in the coverage gap known as the doughnut hole will start getting some help. they'll receive $250 to help pay for prescriptions and that will over time fill in the doughnut hole. >> reporter: 5.5 million seniors have saved a total of nearly $4.5 billion on prescription drugs since the law was enacted. according to the health and human services department. he also plans to slow spending on medicare. >> i have strengthened medicare. we have added years to the life of medicare. we did it by getting rid of taxpayer subsidies to insurance companies that weren't making people healthier. >> reporter: by 2014, the law requires everyone to have health insurance. whether they purchase it themselves or through their employers. and insurers can't deny you if you have a pre-existing condition or increase your rates. the law has become a cornerstone of the oba
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)